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Bringing new perspectives to broad data science challenges

Three Ohio State research projects—each involving College of Engineering faculty—will receive $800,000 in TRIPODS+X awards from the National Science Foundation (NSF). Building on the success of its 2017 Transdisciplinary Research in Principles of Data Science (TRIPODS) program, NSF is awarding a total of $8.5 million in TRIPODS+X grants to 19 collaborative projects at 23 universities for 2018.

TRIPODS brings together the statistics, mathematics, and theoretical computer science communities to develop the theoretical foundations of data science through integrated research and training activities focused on core algorithmic, mathematical and statistical principles. The TRIPODS+X grants will expand the scope of the cross-disciplinary TRIPODS institutes into broader areas of science, engineering and mathematics. In the picture, (l to r) Tamal Dey and fellow TRIPODS researchers Yusu Wang, Facundo Memoli, David Sivakoff, Matthew Kahle and Sebastian Kurtek

Tamal Dey, professor of computer science and engineering, will receive $300,000 for his project “Collaborative Research: Improving Templated Microstructures via Topological Data Analysis.” Co-principal investigator is Sebastian Kurtek, associate professor of statistics.

Matthew Kahle, professor of mathematics, will receive $300,000 for his project “Collaborative Research: Thermodynamic Phases and Configuration Space Topology.” Co-principal investigator is Facundo Memoli, associate professor of mathematics and computer science and engineering.

Janet Best, professor of mathematics, will receive $199,983 for “An MBI TGDA+Neuro Program for Undergraduates.” Co-principal investigators are Yusu Wang, professor of computer science and engineering; Sebastian Kurtek, associate professor of statistics; Facundo Memoli, associate professor of mathematics and computer science and engineering; and Yune Lee, assistant professor of speech and hearing.

The TRIPODS institutes align with Harnessing the Data Revolution, one of the 10 Big Ideas for Future NSF Investments, which aims to engage NSF’s grantee community in the pursuit of fundamental research in data science and engineering; the development of a cohesive, federated, national-scale approach to research data infrastructure; and the development of a 21st-century data-capable workforce.

Read the NSF press release.